Gross and net retention are usually the main metrics that customer success managers (CSMs) use. Gross retention shows the percentage of customers who chose to renew the subscription. Net retention shows the same stats but also considers upgrades. The tricky part is that renewals only happen once per period — monthly, quarterly, or yearly — which can be difficult to evaluate the impact of any specific call.

With that in mind, what criteria should a CSM use to measure the success of their client calls? The fact that the CSM “answered all the questions that the client prepared” is valuable…


A key metric for customer success managers (CSM) is how many customers they can retain in their book of business. While there are secondary metrics (such as NPS score), they’re still usually tied to retention. For CSMs, they have calls and meetings with clients. Now, what should CSMs do to make an impact? The first is to ramp up the number of client calls since, from the theory of probability, the more clients you get in touch with, the more you’ll assist. As a result, it’s likely that more clients will choose to renew your product’s subscription. The second is…


Growing as a leader means constantly challenging yourself to help raise your team to even greater heights. For my own self-improvement, I’m always on the hunt for books — which, unfortunately, often don’t draw a distinction between leadership and management. Many of these books have general information on what makes a leader, but supplement it with examples of management. Although the information is valid, it doesn’t always correlate with what’s expected from a leader.

Since the early days of my professional career, I felt that there was a big difference between leadership and management and that the latter has very…


Professional growth in a customer success role is dependent on delivering as many client calls as possible. But no matter how good the onboarding process is, it’s impossible to account for every situation that may come up in a call.

There are, however, common scenarios that junior customer success managers (CSM) often stress over. In the first article of this series, I described seven of these common scenarios and offered recommendations on how to address them. This article will provide even more tips that I hope you’ll find useful in your own exciting journey as a junior CSM!

1. Product…


As the number of companies shifting to a subscription-based business model increases, so does the demand for customer success managers (CSM). With client retention becoming a key metric, every client call needs to add value. But how can we define value? Is it just when the client uses the product more? Or does usage even matter as long as your product helps the client meet their goals?

The answer is usually somewhere in the middle and tied to the client’s initial expectations from the product. This is why the perceived value is important. In my experience at Wrike, I’ve had…


Moving up to a leadership role here at Wrike was both a challenging and exciting experience. I realized how everything was much simpler when I was only responsible for my own results. But as a leader, I gained the responsibility of helping my team achieve amazing results, too. I’m a big supporter of continuous self-education and have been reading a lot of books on management for a long time. However, there’s often a big gap between reading about something and understanding how to apply this knowledge to real-life situations.

In this article, I put together the most important insights I…


Every manager wants a new hire to start bringing value as soon as possible, but before results can happen, companies first need to invest in their employee’s development. Usually, this initial investment is onboarding. That’s where a customer success manager (CSM) steps in. We’re responsible for the crucial stages of initial onboarding: product training and role training. The goal of product training is to dive deep into the company’s product or service and master it to address the clients’ challenges. …


The start of your career as a customer success manager (CSM) is the beginning of an exciting journey: You foster relationships with businesses small and large, and help them achieve amazing results with your product. However, it’s often the case that new CSMs experience a lot of stress and fear about what they should or shouldn’t be doing and the consequences of what they do or don’t do. …


With more businesses hopping onto the trend of changing from a proprietary model to a subscription-based one, a customer success manager role (CSM) can be a great option to consider. Those pursuing this career path often have experience in other customer-facing roles, such as account manager, customer support, business consultant, and more. But even though parts of that experience overlap with customer success, there are some overlooked, problematic habits that can lead to problems later.

In this article, we’ll discuss the six don’ts for customer success managers — including assumptions, expectations, and actions — to help you avoid common mistakes…


The deployment process clarifies questions of why a new product should be used, what benefits the company and each team member can expect from it, and how to use it. Without clear answers and transparency, chances are the product won’t be adopted properly or provide a return on investment.

Today we’ll continue our conversation with Brett Bellon and Natalia Cherednikova, who are both deployment consultants here at Wrike. In our previous article, we discussed common mistakes clients and deployment consultants make, so this time we’ll focus on common negative consequences of the lack of deployment. …

Artem Gurnov

Manager, Customer Engagement Global @Wrike

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